CNUP Training Faculty

Julie C. Price, Ph.D.

Professor, Radiology, Biostatistics

Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University (1992)

Office: B-938 Presbyterian University Hospital
Telephone:412-647-0714
Fax:412-647-0700
E-mail: pricejc@upmc.edu
Website: http://www.pet.upmc.edu

Integrated approaches for the analyses of multiple intra-subject neuroimaging measures

Research Summary:

Dr. Price's research involves pharmacokinetic modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired in studies of ligand-binding interactions, blood flow, and glucose metabolism in brain. This multidisciplinary collaborative research includes studies of healthy brain function, neurodegeneration, aging, sleep, depression, eating disorders, and diabetes.

A recent focus has been the development of technology for the non-invasive assessment of amyloid plaques in human brain based upon the development of a PET amyloid imaging agent, by Dr. Price's colleaques, Drs. William Klunk and Chet Mathis, named Pittsburgh Compound-B (or PiB). collaborates Amyloid deposition may be central to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis and begin over a decade before the earliest clinical symptoms. Our group performed the initial fully quantitative evaluation of the PiB PET methodology and verification that simplified methods were valid for its routine use in control, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD subjects.

Current methods work is focused on establishing criteria to identify amyloid-positive (PiB+) from amyloid-negative (PIB-) individuals. The accurate distinction of PiB+ individuals is important as this group may benefit most from anti-amyloid therapy. Another effort is aimed at relating voxel-level measures of PIB retention, FDG metabolism and structural MR volumes in control, MCI, and AD subjects, on a longitudinal basis. We are also working on integrative analysis methods that can provide more comprehensive assessments of an individual’s functional status based upon measures obtained from multiple modalities (e.g. PET neuroreceptor or amyloid binding measures and task-related or resting state fMRI measures).

Selected Publications:

Fisher, P.M., Meltzer, C.C., Price, J.C., Coleman, R.L., Ziolko, S.K., Becker, C., Moses-Kolko, E., Berga, S.L. and Hariri AR. Medial prefrontal cortex 5-HT2A density Is correlated with amygdala reactivity, Response Habituation and Functional Coupling. Cerebral Cortex 2009; 19(11):2499-2507. PMID: 19321655; PMCID: 2758681

Cohen, A.D., Price, J.C., Weissfeld, L.A., James, J., Rosario, B.L., Bi, W.Z., Nebes, R.D., Saxton, J.A., Snitz, B.E., Aizenstein, H.J., Wolk, D.A., DeKosky, S.T., Mathis, C.A. and Klunk, W.E. Basal Cerebral Metabolism May Modulate the Cognitive Effects of Abeta in Mild Cognitive Impairment: An Example of Brain Reserve. J Neuroscience 2009;29(47):14770-14778. PMID: 19940172; PMCID: PMC2810461

Xu, L., Mazumdar, S. and Price, J.C. Covariate Adjustment in Partial Least Squares for the Extraction of the Spatial-Temporal Pattern from Positron Emission Tomography Data. Stat Methodol 4: 44-63, 2007.

Fisher, P.M., Meltzer, C.C., Ziolko, S.K., Price, J.C. and Hariri, A.R.. Capacity for 5-HT1A-mediated autoregulation predicts amygdala reactivity. Nature Neuroscience; 9: 1362-1363. 2006

Price, J.C., Klunk, W.E., Lopresti, B.J., Lu, X., Hoge, J.A., Ziolko, S.K., Holt, D.P., Meltzer, C.C. and DeKosky, S.T, Pittsburgh Compound-B. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 25: 1528-1547, 2005.